Artist Trading Cards

Wikipedia says that ATC’s are, “Artist trading cards (or ATCs) are miniature works of art about the same size as modern trading cards baseball cards, or 2 1⁄2 by 3 1⁄2 inches (64 mm × 89 mm), small enough to fit inside standard card-collector pockets, sleeves or sheets. The ATC movement developed out of the mail art movement and has its origins in Switzerland. Cards are produced in various media, including dry media (pencils, pens, markers, etc.), wet media (watercolor, acrylic paints, etc.), paper media (in the form of collage, papercuts, found objects, etc.) or even metals or fiber. The cards are usually traded or exchanged.

atcJohn Dyhouse breaks making an ATC down into 6 simple steps.  I created a word document of the steps and added a few of my own. Artist Trading Cards.docx
Artist Trading Cards .pdf

  1. Find or create your background
  2. Find and select the main image.
  3. Select details to enhance or embellish the ATC design.
  4. Select text or quote (optional)
  5. Play with the elements to create your design
  6. Finalize the design and glue down
  7. Finalize the back of the card
    (sign your work)

Ideas for ATC

Art Ed Guru suggests: “Trading Cards: [History, Cultures] Create trading cards (2) for a famous artist in history based on a list provided by the teacher, chosen from a hat, or based on student interest. One card should show the artist, and their personal information on the back, similar to a baseball card. The second should be an artwork they are known for, with an illustration on the front, and simple but pertinent information on the back. These can be presented to the class, but also used later as a matching game to reinforce concepts, or copied and used to make a class set of flashcards for studying.”

Follow Janis’s board Art Ed. – Artist Trading Cards on Pinterest.

ATC Links:

Elementary Art Books

On the art teacher facebook group teachers recommend the following books for the artroom:

    • The Dot
    • Ish
    • Art Dog
    • When Pigasso Met Mootisse
    • anything in the Getting to Know World’s Famous Artist series,
    • Mouse Paint
    • Color Dance
    • Rabbit’s Color Book
    • Why is Blue Dog Blue
    • Roberto the Insect Architect
    • I Ain’t Gonna Paint No More
    • Beautiful Oops
    • The Squiggle
    • Snail Trail
    • The Museum
    • The Hungry Caterpillar
    • Mousterpiece
    • The Cat and the Bird,
    • My Many Colored Days,
    • Monster’s Love Colors
    • Purple, Green & Yellow
    • Harold and the Purple Crayon
    • One by Catherine Otoshi
    • Art & Max
    • The Day The Crayon Quits
    • a day with no crayons
    • beautiful oops
    • When Sophie Gets Angry, Really, Really Angry by Molly Bang (color/emotion)
    • Painting the Wind,
    • Linnea in Monet’s Garden…
    • Round Trip,
    • Bear’s Picture,
    • The Noisy Paint Box,
    • Too Much Glue,
    • A Bird in Winter,
    • Uncle Andy’s Cats,
    • Sandy’s Circus,
    • Action Jackson,
    • The Calder Game,
    • The Wright 3,
    • Chasing Vermeer
    • Do you do a digeridoo,
    • This Moose belongs to me,
    • Falling for Rapunzel,
    • Rosie Revere Engineer,
    • Larry Gets Lost in New York,
    • Math-terpieces by Greg Tang
    • my blue is happy
    • the 14th dragon
    • the princess and the peacocks
    • What makes a picasso, a picasso

Useful Links

 

Artist Report

On the facebook group Art Teachers, there were two cool artist report ideas that I saw today.
The first was a painting on a bottle with the report rolled up as the message in the bottle. This project is the idea of Jodie Kill-Victoria. Here is what she has to say,

“Tried a different approach to teaching art history with my high school painting class this semester. This lesson involved researching, evaluating, recreating and writing a personal letter to an artist from history that they were given. We painted using acrylic paint and sealed our bottles with a spray gloss. We then rolled up our letters for the finished “Message in a Bottle” art lesson.”

The second idea is an artist sketchbook report. This was created by
The elements on the page are 5 cool facts, 5 identifying characteristics, why are they important, a quote and 7 pictures of their work.

Task Party

I first read about Task Party’s on my Art Teacher Facebook group from a post written by Ian Sands.Another art teacher, Mrs. B, has done this in her classroom – This activity is just TASK-ing to have fun. From her blog:

What? In other words, TASK is an activity where artists pull a TASK from the task box which can be interpreted any way the artist chooses. Then each artist contributes a TASK to the TASK box for others to interpret. “You take one, you write one” TASKS can be anything…from build a treehouse to do a line dance, to brush your teeth.

Materials offered to the artists can vary and include, paper, scissors, cardboard, yarn, string, glue, foil, bubble wrap, paint, crayons, tape….it is really up to the teacher. And, constraints can be added like time allotted or limiting materials.

I also read about it on Art 21’s blog – Oliver Herrin’gs Big Art Pary.
I must do this in my classroom.
Task ideas are:
Become invisible
Build a treehouse
Play your favorite childhood game
Make a garden
Pop out of a box and scare people
Put small pieces of tape on 10 people
Become a silent statue for 5 minutes
Create a tape circle with 5 people inside
Make a tea party